August 3, 2014

Adolescents

depressed-teen-counselling-vancouver2Depression
Depression is a mental illness called a mood disorder. Mood disorders affect the way you feel, which also affects the way you think and act. With depression, you may feel ‘down,’ hopeless, tired all the time, or simply unable to enjoy your favourite things. You may also feel irritable or angry, or ‘numb’ inside. Depression usually begins between the ages of 15 and 30, and it can affect anyone—even younger teens and children. It is not just an adult problem – even young people can experience mental illnesses like depression and anxiety.
Learn More >

Anxiety
All adolescents experience fears, worries and at some time cling to their parents for reassurance. Adolescents with anxiety have worried or fearful feelings more often and with more detriment to the functioning of their lives.
Learn More >

Sexual Abuse
Child sexual abuse is one of the most damaging forms of child abuse that can be enacted on a child. It leaves lasting scars on every facet of the developing child: physical, emotional, psychological.
Learn More >

Chronic Pain
Chronic pain is defined as a condition of pain that persists rather than getting better. The nervous system can sometimes become oversensitized to the pain signals, and they keep firing for weeks, months, or sometimes years. Chronic pain in children has been defined as pain lasting for longer than three months. It is a pain that persists beyond the time when healing would naturally occur.
Learn More >

Chronic Illness
Chronic illness refers to diagnosed medical conditions that cause some degree of chronic disability to life. Chronic diseases are different. They can be slow to develop, long lasting, and can be progressive and incurable. For many chronic diseases, there is no cure. The long-term effects of a chronic illness may be difficult to predict.
Learn More >

Separation and Divorce
Learn More >

Grief and Loss
Learn More >

PTSD/trauma – children and adolescents
Children and adolescents suffer traumas the same as adults do, however there are confounding factors of development that create a more complex picture for them. Young people are not fully grown, which means distressing events play a part in determining their course of growth and development. And they may not be able to understand or even verbalize their experiences.
Learn More >

Low self-esteem in teenagers
Self-esteem is a concept that describes how a person thinks and feels about themselves. Teenagers have a particular challenge when it comes to self-image, as they become self-conscious and questioning as part of their developmental process. However, adolescence does not have to be a time of suffering. With the right foundations, teens can approach life believing he or she is a good person who deserves love and support and can succeed in life.
Learn More >

Suicidality
Suicidality  refers to thoughts and feelings of suicide. This does not mean that a person need be actively trying to end their life, or even talking about it. This means if a young person has thoughts like, “I should just end it all” or “what is the point of living”, they are having thoughts and feelings serious enough to warrant help.
Learn More >

Eating Disorders
Eating Disorders are a complex and challenging group of issues based on food related behaviours. Little is known of the exact cause of each, and it is theorized that they arise from an array of factors including individual temperament, individual metabolism and physiological make-up, family dynamics, tendency toward anxiety, tendency toward obsessive-compulsiveness.
Learn More >

Substance Abuse
Learn More >

High-risk Behaviour
Learn More >

School-related Issues
School related issues in adolescents can be complicated and extremely challenging to face. Unlike similar issues in younger children, adolescents bring an added level of challenge due to their developmental imperative, and their proximity to adulthood. Issues relating to school can be varied, as skill levels, maturity, temperament, developmental level, mental health, emotional background and relationship with authority vary youth by youth.
Learn More >

Parent-teen Conflict
It isn’t necessarily true that all teens fight with their parents. True, adolescence is a challenging time for the teen. Physical and developmental changes can be intense, added to the emotional and social stressors teens face, and the pervasive bombardment of unscreened information from technology, and any teen would feel overwhelmed to the point of shut down. But sometimes, the relationship is fraught with tension, irritation and impatience from one side or the other. Sometimes it’s a pattern that can be hard to break, and may seem hopeless to repair. It can certainly feel easier to let the teen “go” then to put up with the conflict.
Learn More >

Autonomy and Responsibility
As children grow, they naturally crave  more “grown up” experiences and responsibilities. This occurs particularly in adolescence, when it is a developmental imperative for teens to learn how to identify themselves as independent in the world. Some teens do this smoothly, handling the responsibilities of taking on part-time jobs, staying out later, learning to drive or starting to be sexually active, for example. Others, who may have more challenging emotional or developmental circumstances, don’t go through this change as smoothly.
Learn More >

Stress and Coping
Learn More >